Income Generation

My previous experience in the area of fundraising/ income generation has ranged from developing strategies that include community fundraising campaigns and initiatives, major/ high value donor development (in particular work with wealth management organisations on philanthropy pipelines), private giving schemes, philanthropic partnerships, crowd source funding campaigns, issues based fundraising campaigns, applications to grant and trust making bodies, working on philanthropic CSR at a micro level with local supermarket stores and independent high-street businesses through to working with major financial groups, banks, other large corporations, and in the area of hedge fund management and venture capitalism. All of this work had the same end point, to improve, change, transform and in some cases, save the lives of those going through a tough time as a result of health inequalities or their socio-economic circumstances. In most cases, my experience has seen such partnerships developed to support the work of community focused, regionally and nationally focused organisations.

Key to the work of transformative organisations; from the delivery teams, through to the operational support, further development and leadership, is relationships. The ability to relate to key funding partners and stake holders with the same value set, and motivation as those who relate to the people that the organisation supports and cares for, is something that is vital in developing long lasting partnerships.


It is my experience that the methods used to develop a successful fundraising strategy have a direct impact on, and are transferable to community based and private sources of income generations (for example the development of a major donor/ philanthropy programme). One of my most notable successes has been in the area of corporate social responsibility development, with that in mind I have always asserted that social welfare and corporate success are intrinsically linked. In addition to this, it is my experience and my view (and one that I would share with corporate partners) that CSR and effective partnerships with charities, is one of the most powerful cultural tools any organisation has.


When developing a fundraising strategy, I always start at the end – the vision if you like. I think it’s important to have the intended goal set-out when devising the strategy. So my vision for income generation within organisations is to develop new partnerships with grant, trust making bodies and foundations, and philanthropic opportunities, and steward and sustain existing partnerships and relationships that generate income and awareness of the work the organistion does within its regional operational footprint and beyond.

The process flow begins with community. By this I mean engagement with potential individual donors within communities and grant and trust making bodies and foundations; but also through the creation, development and nurturing of a community of interest that puts donors alongside the organisation with the intention that relationships and partnerships would be established that will support the work undertaken by the organisation.

The word intention is important in all of this. Whilst relationship is key, I always seek to build intentional relationships with the shared understanding that with organisations and donors I want to build social value, I want to see lives transformed, people supported and cared for when they need it most. An organisations current and future private donors and other funding partners are key to achieving that.

Moving from community, through intention I seek to invest in three areas of fundraising: i) Philanthropy (corporate, private and organisational), ii) CSV – corporate social value/ community development and, iii) SROI

The strand that is the standard priority for charities is the first – philanthropy. This is the strand that would see activity take place that includes sponsorship, donations, community fundraising and charity of the year adoption.


The second strand is possibly the one that is most easily delivered on, as it is almost financially risk free both for the organisation I’m supporting and any potential new partner. A CSV/ Community development strategy would involve greater internal activity for a new partner through the promotion of cause related marketing (CRM), payroll giving, creating and supporting fundraising events, promoting actioneering/ volunteering opportunities and pro bono/ in kind support.

The third strand, SROI is a key area of development that underpins activity in this whole area of developing fundraising partnerships. Regularly updating any SROI document is key in building credible partnerships and helps demonstrate long-term benefit to the lives of people though the work of the organisation, and therefore ensure it’s ability to generate long-term partnerships/ relationships with funding partners and individuals. Part of SROI development involves, what I think is a key hook when taking a relational approach; hearts and minds – the power of the story. Whether it’s a relationship built with a grant/ trust making body or foundation, personal philanthropy or corporate philanthropy; fundamentally it’s the story of the lives of individuals that have been transformed that draw us in. I can sit alongside funding partners and talk about corporate social value, about the importance of philanthropy and why an organisation should be a long-term beneficiary of a funding partnership or philanthropic giving – but in my experience, the deal is sealed when you can intentionally look into someone’s eyes and tell them a story of a life that has been transformed and explain how that directly relates to their giving. A key feature of an income generation role is having the ability to “tell the story”, to inspire, to bring potential donors on the journey to see lives transformed through the work of the respective organisation. The most effective tool in any fundraising toolkit won’t be a well thought out graphic, a compelling media campaign, a well-managed social media campaign; it’s what I’ve already described – the most effective fundraising tool are

Ref: Trusts and Major Giving Fundraiser
My previous experience in the area of fundraising/ income generation has ranged from developing strategies that include community fundraising campaigns and initiatives, major/ high value donor development (in particular work with wealth management organisations on philanthropy pipelines), private giving schemes, philanthropic partnerships, crowd source funding campaigns, issues based fundraising campaigns, applications to grant and trust making bodies, working on philanthropic CSR at a micro level with local supermarket stores and independent high-street businesses through to working with major financial groups, banks, other large corporations, and in the area of hedge fund management and venture capitalism. All of this work had the same end point, to improve, change, transform and in some cases, save the lives of those going through a tough time as a result of health inequalities or their socio-economic circumstances. In most cases, my experience has seen such partnerships developed to support the work of community focused, regionally and nationally focused organisations.
Key to the work of transformative organisations like Kirkwood Hospice; from the clinical teams, through to the operational support, further development and leadership, is relationships. The ability to relate to key funding partners and stake holders with the same value set, and motivation as those who relate to the people that the hospice supports and cares for, is something that is vital in developing long lasting partnerships.
It is my experience that the methods used to develop a successful fundraising strategy have a direct impact on, and are transferable to community based and private sources of income generations (for example the development of a major donor/ philanthropy programme). One of my most notable successes has been in the area of corporate social responsibility development, with that in mind I have always asserted that social welfare and corporate success are intrinsically linked. In addition to this, it is my experience and my view (and one that I would share with corporate partners) that CSR and effective partnerships with charities, is one of the most powerful cultural tools any organisation has.
When developing a fundraising strategy, I always start at the end – the vision if you like. Whilst the vision is prescribed within the job description, I think it’s important to have the intended goal set-out when devising the strategy. So my vision would be to develop new partnerships with grant, trust making bodies and foundations, and philanthropic opportunities, and steward and sustain existing partnerships and relationships that generate income and awareness of the work Kirkwood hospice does within the operational footprint of Kirklees and beyond.
The process flow would begin with community. By this I mean engagement with potential individual donors within communities and grant and trust making bodies and foundations; but also through the creation, development and nurturing of a community of interest that puts donors alongside Kirkwood hospice with the intention that relationships and partnerships would be established that will support the work undertaken by the charity.
The word intention is important in all of this. Whilst relationship is key, I would seek to build intentional relationships with the shared understanding that with organisations and donors we want to build social value, we want to see lives transformed, people supported and cared for when they need it most. The Kirkwood hospice’s current and future private donors and other funding partners are key to achieving that.
Moving from community, through intention I would seek to invest in three areas of fundraising: i) Philanthropy (corporate, private and organisational), ii) CSV – corporate social value/ community development and, iii) SROI
The strand that is the standard priority for charities is the first – philanthropy. This is the strand that would see activity take place that includes sponsorship, donations, community fundraising and charity of the year adoption.
The second strand is possibly the one that would be most easily delivered on, as it is almost financially risk free both for Kirkwood hospice and any potential new partner. A CSV/ Community development strategy would involve greater internal activity for a new partner through the promotion of cause related marketing (CRM), payroll giving, creating and supporting fundraising events, promoting actioneering/ volunteering opportunities and pro bono/ in kind support.
The third strand, SROI would be a key area of development that could underpin activity in this whole area of developing fundraising partnerships. Regularly updating any SROI document will be key in building credible partnerships and will help demonstrate long-term benefit to the lives of people though the work of the hospice, and therefore ensure we are
Rich Jones
13 Marland Way Stretford M32 0NP t: 44(0) 7960 179056 e: rich@richjones.net w: richjones.net
24th August, 2020

able to generate long-term partnerships/ relationships with funding partners and individuals. Part of SROI development involves, what I think is a key hook when taking a relational approach; hearts and minds – the power of the story. Whether it’s a relationship built with a grant/ trust making body or foundation, personal philanthropy or corporate philanthropy; fundamentally it’s the story of the lives of individuals that have been transformed that draw us in. I can sit alongside funding partners and talk about corporate social value, about the importance of philanthropy and why Kirkwood hospice should be a long-term beneficiary of a funding partnership or philanthropic giving – but in my experience, the deal is sealed when you can intentionally look into someone’s eyes and tell them a story of a life that has been transformed and explain how that directly relates to their giving. A key feature of this role will be having the ability to “tell the story”, to inspire, to bring potential donors on the journey to see lives transformed through the work of the hospice. The most effective tool in our fundraising toolkit won’t be a well thought out graphic, a compelling media campaign, a well-managed social media campaign; it’s what I’ve already described – the most effective fundraising tool we have are the stories of lives transformed.

Developing a community of interest gives the organisation a greater chance of success in generating long-term funding partnerships, investing in opportunities for partners to experience the value of their investment first hand raises the chances of the investment levels increasing as the partnership develops.

I recognise that we are in uncertain times, with many challenges facing the charity sector. But as a social innovator, I also recognise the opportunities that these times present through creative collaborations and entrepreneurial strategic thinking. My previous experience, current conversations with organisations in similar situations and proactive nature, will I’m sure result in quick, effective and long-lasting results for any organisation in the third sector.